C is for pumpkin

Work has stalled on my ABC quilt, but I used the same idea to make a little wall-hanging for my Spanish teacher, who recently had a baby girl. Each Saturday, I catch the bus into town and take a Spanish class. The lessons started for my trip to Spain, but I am enjoying them and plan to continue.

Another student was going to crochet a blanket as a gift from the class, but life got in the way. As she said, ‘The human gestation period is too short!’ I really wanted to play with a small version of my ABC quilt, so I offered to step in.

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

The colours are not quite right here, but at least you can see the full quilt.

The images associated with each letter will seem a bit strange to English speakers, but I did some research to see which images were commonly associated with letters in Spanish.

A es para abeja.
B es para bebé.
C es para calabaza.

A is for bee.
B is for baby.
C is for pumpkin.

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

The baby was the trickiest block to sew, and I lost a little definition by using a pale pink for the baby’s skin, but I am really happy with it.

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

This was the first block I made, and I really enjoyed pulling out all my orange fabrics.

Initially, I planned to make the blocks quilt-as-you-go, using small scraps of wadding, but I found two bits of quilt wadding in the cupboard that I could zigzag together to make a large enough piece.

I free-motion quilted lots of small loops. The quilting is a bit too close and stiff for a bed quilt, but it works well for a wall-hanging. The small loops allowed me to get in all the small spaces around the designs, which I also outlined by quilting in the ditch. Given how nervous free-motion quilting makes me, I am really happy with how this turned out. I can see me gradually overcoming my fear. I was on a sewing retreat when I quilted this, and I did start after dinner and a glass of wine!

This wall-hanging also is only my second attempt at a hanging sleeve. I usually make bed or lap quilts, and the only other hanging sleeve I have made was for my tree growth chart. Hanging sleeves are easy, but I had never really needed them before!

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

I used a green chevron print on the back.

All of the designs are from Kumiko Fujita’s book Patchwork Patterns 318, which has rapidly become a favourite, and all of the fabric was from my stash as I am still on a fabric diet.

I have heard that Kumiko Fujita’s book Patchwork Patterns 318 is soon to be published in an English edition, after being out of print in Japanese for a very long time. Hurrah! It has some fabulous patterns, and I recommend it to anyone who likes beautiful but slightly challenging projects. Kumiko Fujita always hand sews her blocks, so some are impossible to piece entirely by machine.

Before the class gave our teacher the quilt, I took it to the park for a photoshoot.

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

I tried photographing the baby quilt on a stone wall.

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

I tried photographing the baby quilt on the lawn.

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

I tried photographing the baby quilt in among the everlastings.

ABC baby quilt, featuring paper-pieced patterns by Kumiko Fujita, by Granny Maud’s Girl

OK, so the everlasting daisies obscure the quilt, but are they not pretty?

I am linking up with Alyce of Blossom Heart Quilts and Sew Cute Tuesday. I have never done a linky thingy before, but I am so thrilled with this tiny quilt, I need to share! (Update: I think there is no Sew Cute Tuesday this week, so perhaps I cannot link as I planned.) In fact, as this post goes live, I will be in the same city as Alyce: beautiful Tokyo! I put a clause in my fabric diet that allows me to buy a few gorgeous Japanese fabrics while on holiday.

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42 thoughts on “C is for pumpkin

  1. Carla, this quilt is absolutely adorable and you must banish those FMQing fears! Your quilting looks fabulous!! The pictures are beautiful too 🙂

    Have a wonderful time and everyone knows diets are not allowed when one is on holiday 😉

  2. Carla,
    I can’t wait to show this to my daughter…she is a Spanish professor and will love it! Bien hecho, amiga. Diviertate in Japon.

  3. You do get about Carla. I”m sure the Spanish teacher will be thrilled with the quilt. It’s really lovely, and your photos show it off nicely too.The baby is very cleverly done.

  4. Carla, this is just so darling! Of course, until I read the story behind it I was a bit worried about your letters. Who knew, C is for pumpkin. Which is my favorite part of this project. Just love it and all the pretty orange fabrics. I’m sure your teacher loved it.

  5. Pingback: Whimsical quilts | Granny Maud's Girl

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