Stripy binding tutorial

For my rainbow baby quilt, I wanted the stripes of the binding to join neatly, without obvious jumps in the stripes, so this is what I did.

A note before I begin: normally, I cut my quilt binding on the bias. I like the way bias binding has ‘give’. To get the striped effect I was after here, however, I did not do that. I simply cross-cut my 2½-inch binding strips from the width of the fabric.

You might find you need an extra strip or two of binding to allow for the small amount that is wasted while matching up the pattern. When you are buying fabric, allow for that.

All of your binding joins will be almost invisible, except for the last one. When you sew the binding to your quilt, you cannot force where the last two ends will join. Sorry! One unattractive visible join is far better than lots and lots of them.

Step 1

Cut one of the ends of one binding strip at a 45-degree angle (top), making sure that you cut off the selvedge and where you cut corresponds to a similar pattern on the end of your other binding strip (bottom).

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

Cut one of the ends of one binding strip at a 45-degree angle.

Step 2

Overlap the two ends, and make small marks on the uncut strip where the two meet.

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

Overlap the cut binding strip on the uncut strip. Make small marks on the top and bottom near the cut edge.

Step 3

Set the already cut strip aside and mark the other strip at a 45-degree angle, a ½ inch away from your small markings and towards the end you plan to cut off and discard.

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

Mark a line a ½ inch away from your initial small marks, towards the end you plan to cut off and discard, using the 45-degree line on your ruler.

Step 4

Cut along the 45-degree line you have marked.

As you do this more often, you can skip step 3 and simply measure and cut in one go, but it helps to mark and then cut in the beginning. Marking gives you thinking and checking time.

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

Cut along the line you have marked.

The two ends you plan to join together should now look something like this.

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

The two binding strip ends, when cut, will not match up just yet because of the seam allowances.

Step 5

Pin carefully and sew between the Vs using a ¼-inch seam allowance.

I find it helps to mark the seam line on the wrong side of one piece and use this line when pinning and aligning the stripes. I suggest you sew the first one or two joins with big, easy-to-unpick stitches until you get the knack of how to pin them to match up the stripes.

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

Pin carefully and sew between the Vs.

Step 6

Press the seam open and then press the binding in half as you would normally.

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

Press the seam flat, and it should look something like this.

Stripy binding tutorial by Granny Maud's Girl

Press your binding in half, with the wrong sides together, and you are ready to sew the binding onto your quilt!

You can now go back to my post about the baby quilt I used this binding on and stare at the photos until you find the one not-quite-invisible last join.

Advertisements

16 thoughts on “Stripy binding tutorial

  1. Or you could be like me, cheat horrendously and join the strips along one stripe and have a slightly bulky spot. I’m much lazier and less of a perfectionist than you are, but that doesn’t stop me being lost in admiration!

  2. Wow, those stripes are spot on! I usually avoid prints like the one you used because I can never line them up. Now I guess I have no more excuses!

I appreciate your comments and will reply by email.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s